CMF-Metal Foam Shields the Warfighter

We’ve seen countless composite metal foam (CMF) applications within the automotive, orthopedics, thermal and even interior design industries. Recent exploration by Scientists at North Carolina State University and the U.S. Army’s Aviation Applied Technology Directorate has lead to a new application for CMF that is astonishing.

 Fortifying Composite Metal Foam Shields the Warfighter

U.S. Army explores the strength of CMF and it’s ability to protect tanks and combat vehicles. Traditionally, armor steel plates are used to shield the vehicles. By utilizing CMF, the armor weight of combat vehicles has the potential to be reduced by 65%. This could eventually lead to improved speeds and maneuverability.

“In one test, one inch of this remarkable foam faced off against an M2 .30 caliber armor piercing bullet. The bullet travels with 2,780 foot-pounds of energy and when it makes contact with the foam, that armor piercing round is Hulk-smashed by the foam (New foam armor for tanks can pulverize enemies).”

Tested against armor piercing rounds, explosions and extreme heat, the CMF proved remarkable.Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) cause detrimental damage. Foam armor absorbs the blast and lessens the traumatic effects of shock waves on the warfighter within. We congratulate the Scientists at North Carolina State University and the U.S. Army’s Aviation Applied Technology Directorate on the discovery and look forward to future findings on the miracle foam.